The 9 Most Common Dental Problems: Tooth Decay

It’s no surprise that dental problems can emerge from a variety of places: the wrong foods, genetics, a chipped tooth from a football game that results in a root canal in the future. One of the most important things we can do as practitioners is to help patients engage with and deeply understand their own health, including why these problems emerge and what we can to do treat them. It’s for this effort that we examine the nine most common dental problems that we see on a regular basis.

Problem Six: Tooth Decay

It may not surprise you to find out that the most common “disease” in the US is the common cold. However, it you might be surprised to learn that tooth decay is the 2nd most common ailment amongst our population.

When plaque sits on the teeth and mixes with sugars and acids produced by bacteria, it can have a disastrous effect on the enamel of our teeth, causing decay. Unfortunately, once your enamel is gone, it cannot be replaced and your dentist may have to place a crown or dental implant. If not treated quickly, the decay just continues and can lead to severe problems like periodontal (gum) disease.

In order to prevent decay from occurring and causing long-term damage to your teeth, there are some routines and habits that you can adopt:

– Brush twice daily

– Floss once per day

– Eat foods and drinks that are low in sugar and acid

– Schedule routine dental cleanings at least once every six months (check with your dentist for the right frequency for you)

– Drink lots of water (particularly after eating) to wipe away acid from the enamel of your teeth

If you have any questions about tooth decay or if you would like to schedule a free consultation, please contact our team or make an appointment. Our incredible staff will give you the best dental care possible.

Schedule a Free Consultation

We are dedicated to making your smile the brightest it can be. Fill out the form below to schedule a free consultation.

Sources
Notice to Website Viewers

The contents of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the Site (“Content”) are for informational purposes only. No doctor/patient relationship is established by your use of this site. No diagnosis or treatment is being provided. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical or dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician, dentist, or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical or dental condition. The information contained here should be used in consultation with a dentist of your choice. No guarantees or warranties are made regarding any of the information contained within this web site. This web site is not intended to offer specific medical, dental or surgical advice to anyone. Further, this web site, the creators of the website, and the owners of the website take no responsibility for web sites hyper-linked to this site and such hyperlinking does not imply any relationships or endorsements of the linked sites. Reliance on any information provided by the Site or others appearing on the Site at our invitation, or other visitors to the Site is solely at your own risk.

Start typing and press Enter to search